How do I Use a Car Broker to Buy a New Car?

A broker can put you in your dream car.

A broker can put you in your dream car.

Finding time to buy a new car can be difficult. Working, kids, errands and other things can consume your every waking moment and at the end of the day you still don't have a new car. Many people turn to car brokers to find the car of their dreams. A car broker gathers information about what you want in a vehicle, then does the searching for you. Once he finds a car that seems to fit your specifications, you take a look at it and decide whether or not to make the purchase.

Find a broker. Asking friends for recommendations, checking online for brokers in your area and checking with the local Chamber of Commerce can lead you to several brokers who are not tied into dealerships. According to Edmunds.com, a broker tied to a dealership will probably not try hard to locate the best deal, other than the best deal from the dealership who pays him. Find a local broker who has an independent office.

Ask to see his license. Brokers must be licensed to sell cars in the state in which they work. Avoid unlicensed brokers as they are flying under the radar and there may be a reason.

Ask questions about her previous work. Request references and call them to find out how satisfied they were with the broker's services. Ask the broker if she receives money from any dealership and how she normally searches for cars for customers. Ask about the fee to have her find your car.

Give the broker information about the car you want. The more detailed the information, the better equipped your broker will be to find exactly what you want. Limited or inaccurate information will waste both your time and the broker's time searching out cars you don't like. Make sure to include any non-negotiable items on the list, such as four doors versus two doors, a sun roof, or the type of audio system you prefer.

Test drive the vehicle the broker brings you. After the broker searches and finds a car that meets your requirements, you still need to test drive it to be sure it feels right for you. Once you're satisfied with the car, make the purchase and pay the broker his fee.

Warning

  • Many people calling themselves car brokers are really on the dealership's payroll. Be sure to ask about dealership affiliations and steer clear of brokers who are tied financially to any dealership.
 

About the Author

Candace Webb has been writing professionally since 1989. She has worked as a full-time journalist as well as contributed to metropolitan newspapers including the "Tennessean." She has also worked on staff as an associate editor at the "Nashville Parent" magazine. Webb holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism with a minor in business from San Jose State University.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images