Ideas for Remodeling a 5X7 Bathroom

Floating cabinets allow more visual floor space to open up a room.

Floating cabinets allow more visual floor space to open up a room.

You can pack a powerful punch into a small, 5-by-7-foot bathroom with the right combination of color, texture, placement and design. When real estate is at a premium, it’s time to pull out all the stops and create the illusion of space with simple, yet effective, home decor tricks for your remodel.

Color

It’s hard to beat a simple, neutral color palette when you are trying to make a small space look big. Avoid busy patterns and opt for large blocks of solid color on the walls in natural hues of grey or tan. White ceilings and floors will open up the space from top to bottom. A white tub, sink and toilet combination will unify the fixtures with the floor and ceiling and help visually expand the room.

Texture

Smooth, sleek and solid surfaces offer a continuous and flowing feeling -- even in a small room. Porcelain fixtures and tiles provide the smooth and sleek surfaces you’ll need. Light or medium-tone solid-wood cabinets and countertops introduce a warm, natural texture without closing in the room or breaking up the flow. Shiny stainless steel hardware blends into the mix with a touch of bling to brighten up the space.

Placement

Place the bath tub on a 5-foot end wall to allow the most floor space for the remaining bathroom fixtures. Arrange the toilet tightly between the tub and vanity to extend the space vertically. Fill the long wall with a long, continuous mirror that stretches from the outer edge of the bath tub tile, across the toilet and over the entire length of the vanity. This arrangement will work magic by making the room look double its measured size.

Design

The clean, crisp lines of contemporary fixtures and a wall-hung, floating vanity will provide ample storage. The open space below the vanity will allow you to view more floor tile than a base cabinet vanity -- giving the illusion of extra floor space. Raise the ceiling to the rafters, if possible, to further enlarge the space. Finish the design with a frameless glass tub enclosure in lieu of a shower curtain or frosted glass doors.

 

About the Author

Terry Mulligan has been writing since 2007. As an accomplished artist, decorator and business professional, she enjoys covering art, decor, business management, real estate, education, computers/software/ERP, animal rescue, cooking and self-improvement. Mulligan holds an M.B.A. from the University of Phoenix.

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