Where to Get a Copy of Your House Site Plan

by Michael Roennevig, Demand Media Google

    Homeowners may need to get their hands on the plans for their property for a variety of reasons. You'll usually need to have a copy of your plot plans if you want to make any major alterations to your property, build a swimming pool or sell your home.

    Step 1

    Check your closing documents. A copy of your house plan should have been included with the papers you received when you bought your property. If you can't find these, contact your mortgage lender and title insurance provider to find out if they have copies of your plot plan.

    Step 2

    Contact your county government offices to find out how to go about ordering copies of your plot plan. Your house drawings will usually be held by local government to make sure your property conforms to building laws and other regulations. You may be able to order a hard copy of your plans, get them sent to you on a CD or download them in digital format. If your plans are stamped or signed by a licensed engineer or architect, you may need to get a letter of release from this professional before copies of your plot plan can be ordered. You will usually have to pay a fee for this service. You may also be able to view your plot plans at your city hall.

    Step 3

    Contact the property developer or builder that constructed your house. There will be a good chance the company that designed and built your property will have your house plan on file, especially if your home was put up relatively recently.

    Step 4

    Hire a surveyor or architect to make a new plot plan for your property if you can't track down your original drawings. This won't be the cheapest option, but it might be your last resort. If you need your house plans for some work you want done or to sell your property, you may have little choice but to pay the cost.

    About the Author

    Michael Roennevig has been a journalist since 2003. He has written on politics, the arts, travel and society for publications such as "The Big Issue" and "Which?" Roennevig holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the Surrey Institute and a postgraduate diploma from the National Council for the Training of Journalists at City College, Brighton.