How to Claim Fence Damage on Homeowners Insurance

Your homeowners insurance might cover damage to your fence.

Your homeowners insurance might cover damage to your fence.

When you have a damaged fence, you might be able to get help with the cost to repair or replace the fence from your homeowners insurance company. Whether or not the insurance company covers the damage depends on how the damage occurred. Typically, if the damage to your fence was caused by a car, vandalism or a storm, the fence is probably covered. However, if the damage happened during a flood or earthquake, unless your insurance policy specifically covers this type of damage, the fence might not be covered.

Call the police and file a report if another person caused the damage. The officer will document and take pictures of the damage. Write down the name of the officer and ask for a copy of the police report.

Contact your homeowners insurance company and ask whether the damage is covered. If it is, file a claim. The company will send you a few claim forms, which you have to fill out to report the damage.

Take pictures or video of the fence, covering the entire damaged area from all angles. If possible, find a picture or video of the fence before the damage occurred.

Meet with the insurance company’s adjuster and provide the police report if the damage was caused by vandalism, pictures of the damage and pictures of the fence before the damage. The adjuster will inspect the fence and report the damages to the insurance company. Once the insurance company has all of the information needed to process your claim, you’ll receive a check to fix the damage.

Tips

  • Write down the names of each person you speak with at your homeowners insurance company. Documentation of conversations can come in handy if the company disputes your claim.
  • If you don’t agree with the insurance company’s settlement offer, call a few contractors to get an estimate of the damage.
 

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Angela M. Wheeland specializes in topics related to taxation, technology, gaming and criminal law. She has contributed to several websites and serves as the lead content editor for a construction-related website. Wheeland holds an Associate of Arts in accounting and criminal justice. She has owned and operated her own income tax-preparation business since 2006.

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