How to Cash a Savings Bond in My Maiden Name

by Angela M. Wheeland, Demand Media
    Banks will generally cash a savings bond -- even though the name doesn't match.

    Banks will generally cash a savings bond -- even though the name doesn't match.

    If you received a savings bond as a gift when you were a kid, you can still cash the bond now -- even though your last name is different. Savings bonds are typically registered under the owner's Social Security number, which doesn't change when the owner gets married. Some savings bonds take as much as 40 years to fully mature, and the U.S Treasury expects the young original owners to grow up and marry. It's normal for banks to cash savings bonds when the name on the bond doesn't match the name on the ID.

    Step 1

    Gather enough documents to prove your identity, including your state ID or driver's license and Social Security card. Although it's not an acceptable form of identification, you should also grab a copy of your marriage license to show proof of your name change.

    Step 2

    Go a bank or financial institution that holds your checking or savings account. If you don't have a bank, call around to find one that cashes savings bonds. Banks are more likely to cash a savings bond from someone who already holds an account at the bank.

    Step 3

    Sign the back of the bond using your married name. Show your ID and Social Security card to the teller.

    Step 4

    Explain that the name on the bond is your maiden name and present your marriage license. The teller will write down your ID number and reason for having a different last name on the back of the bond. She will then cash the bond.

    Tips

    • Banks accept only Savings Notes, EE, E and I series bonds. If your bond is of any other type, you have to redeem the bond through your district's Federal Reserve Bank Savings Bond Processing Site.
    • If you don't have an account at a bank and the bond's value exceeds $1,000, the bank will probably not cash it. You'll have to mail the bond to your district's Federal Reserve Bank Savings Bond Processing Site.

    About the Author

    Angela M. Wheeland specializes in topics related to taxation, technology, gaming and criminal law. She has contributed to several websites and serves as the lead content editor for a construction-related website. Wheeland holds an Associate of Arts in accounting and criminal justice. She has owned and operated her own income tax-preparation business since 2006.

    Photo Credits

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