How to Calculate How Many Solar Power Panels Are Needed for a Whole House

by C. Taylor, Demand Media
    Solar panels allow environmentally conscious homeowners to be self-sufficient.

    Solar panels allow environmentally conscious homeowners to be self-sufficient.

    So, you've decided to go green and use solar panels as an alternative power source. Good for you — you'll be benefiting the environment and, in the long run, you may well save money. However, before taking the leap toward a self-sufficient house, you need to calculate how many panels are required to sustain your normal activities.

    Energy Requirements

    To sustain your entire house, you need to average your daily use of electricity. Your electric bill probably details your average daily use or presents a one-year total. Dividing the one-year total by 365 calculates your daily average. As an example, if you used 6,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) in a year, divide by 365 to calculate your 16.4 kWh daily average.

    Target Daily Average

    Solar panels do not always operate with maximum efficiency. The system may lose stored power or inefficiently collect solar energy. There may also be sustained periods of insufficient sunlight. Therefore, adding a 25-percent cushion protects your system from running out of juice. Multiplying your 16.4 daily average by 1.25 calculates a target daily average of 20.5 kWh.

    Daily Peak Sunlight Hours

    Solar panels rely on the sun to capture electricity, so your panel needs are directly related to the amount of sunlight you get. The Renewable Resource Data Center provides this information for your state and further breaks it down by major city. Dividing the daily requirement by the number of daily peak sunlight hours calculates the amount of energy your panels need to pick up every peak sunlight hour. Continuing with the example, if you lived on Daytona Beach, FL, with 5.2 daily peak sunlight hours, divide 20.5 by 5.2 to calculate 3.94 kW required per hour. Multiply KW by 1,000 to convert the measurement to watts. In the example, multiplying 3.94 times 1,000 converts the figure to 3,940.

    Number of Panels

    Solar panels are available in a wide range of wattages, such as 100-W or 200-W models. The wattage of your panels determines the number of panels you need. Dividing your hourly requirement by the solar panels’ wattage calculates the total number of panels you need. In the example, dividing 3,940 W by a panel's 200-W rating calculates 20 panels needed to sustain your entire house.

    About the Author

    C. Taylor has been a professional writer since 2009. He has written for online publications and the "Journal of Asian Martial Arts." Taylor specializes in martial arts, traveling, sciences and computer repair. He received a Master of Science in wildlife biology from Clemson University and a Bachelor of Arts in biological sciences from the College of Charleston.

    Photo Credits

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