What to Take to a Bank When Applying for a Debt Relief Loan

Take appropriate identification with you when applying for a debt relief loan.

Take appropriate identification with you when applying for a debt relief loan.

A debt relief loan can help you to pay off your debt and achieve peace of mind. However, if you do not provide the necessary documents when you apply for your loan, you may not be approved for the loan or you may unnecessarily delay the approval process. While each lender will have its own policies, some information is generally required when applying for a debt relief loan.


The lender may require multiple forms of identification, including a driver's license, a current passport and/or other government-issued identification. Lenders may require or allow you to use a secondary form of identification, such as a credit card with your photo, an employment identification card, a Social Security card or a birth certificate.

Financial Statements

Take your check stubs for at least the most recent month of earnings. Some lenders may request copies of tax returns, Form W-2, or -- if you are self-employed -- Form 1099. Lenders may also require proof of how you manage your money. You may be required to produce recent bank statements, a monthly budget and a list of your monthly income.


Prior to applying for your loan, you should organize all of your existing bills and calculate the balances that you want to pay off. This calculation can prevent you from borrowing too little or too much. Some lenders may require this information before issuing the loan.

Collateral Statements

Many debt relief loans require collateral. You may need to take a copy of your home's appraisal or a valid statement of your collateral's value. You may also need to provide a copy of your most recent property assessment statement and homeowner's insurance policy.

Other Documents

Lenders may set their own guidelines and require additional documents. Some lenders will require a statement from your employer verifying that you are currently employed and the approximate amount of your wages. You may have to provide proof of your address -- such as a utility bill with your name and current address -- information about your spouse's income, and a discharge letter if you recently declared bankruptcy.


About the Author

Samantha Kemp is a lawyer for a general practice firm. She has been writing professionally since 2009. Her articles focus on legal issues, personal finance, business and education. Kemp acquired her JD from the University of Arkansas School of Law. She also has degrees in economics and business and teaching.

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